A Court of Frost and Starlight Review

A Court of Frost and Starlight Review

By Sarah J. Maas

Publisher: Bloomsbury YA

Print Length: 272 pages

Release Year: 2018

Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 3.88

Available on Amazon and B&N

Hope warms the coldest night.

Feyre, Rhys, and their close-knit circle of friends are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly-changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it, a hard-earned reprieve.

Yet even the festive atmosphere can’t keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated–scars that will have far-reaching impact on the future of their Court. (Goodreads)

As you already know from my reviews on the previous instalments of this series, I am a big fan of A Court of Thorns and Roses. It goes without saying how happy I was to finally get a chance to pick up this book… too bad it did not live up to its predecessors. 

A Court of Frost and Starlight is effectively an ACOTAR Christmas special that just so happens to also happens to give us a glimpse of the war’s aftermath. Now, I have to give Maas, some credit for some of the themes she included regarding that subplot, but not much more. While she included very real aspects of post-war life, the way they were handled was… not that realistic. Yes, this is a fantasy series, but that doesn’t necessarily excuse the sort of detached feeling I got from this book. Of course, I am taking into consideration the disassociation that often follows those who have fought in a war, but this just wasn’t it. 

The only aspect of this book that truly shines is the deeper look into the found-family relationship between the inner circle. If you take out the post-war aspect of this story, its a mostly heart-warming tale of a family during holidays. The sections that focused solely on this is what made the book bearable for me, as it managed to cheer me up during our not-so-typical holiday season. And while the character has always been just as important as the plot in these stories, this one, in particular, took a lot of time to look at each character individually and give us insight on who they are and how they think without the shroud of intense hardship. We get a glimpse into seemingly everyday life, which in these times we sort of need. 
I didn’t enjoy this book as much as I had hoped to, but it did manage to make my holiday season a little better. And I might as well admit it is what I needed to hold me over until the much-awaited release of A Court of Silver Flames. This is not a necessary read, and I won’t judge anyone who decides to skip it. But, in saying that, it’s not worthless either.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Forest of Souls Review

Forest of Souls Review

By Lori M. Lee

Publisher: Page Street Kids

Print Length: 400 pages

Release Year: 2020

Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 3.69

Available on Amazon and B&N

Sirscha Ashwyn comes from nothing, but she’s intent on becoming something. After years of training to become the queen’s next royal spy, her plans are derailed when shamans attack and kill her best friend Saengo.

And then Sirscha, somehow, restores Saengo to life.

Unveiled as the first soulguide in living memory, Sirscha is summoned to the domain of the Spider King. For centuries, he has used his influence over the Dead Wood—an ancient forest possessed by souls—to enforce peace between the kingdoms. Now, with the trees growing wild and untamed, only a soulguide can restrain them. As war looms, Sirscha must master her newly awakened abilities before the trees shatter the brittle peace, or worse, claim Saengo, the friend she would die for. (Goodreads)

Forest of Souls was one of my most anticipated releases of 2020. I was so excited when I finally got my hands on it that I had to force myself to slow down a bit. I’m trying to spend a longer time in books like this because I want to really take my time to contemplate and savour the story. While the story was fast-paced, throwing you into the action immediately, I managed to slow my reading pace comfortably. Lee does an amazing job of showing rather than telling, so whenever I set the book down I had plenty to think about. Regardless of the fact that I came to the same conclusions as our protagonist as quickly as she did, it allowed me to explore aspects of the story that the author set aside. This only adds to my excitement for the upcoming sequel Spider’s Web, because I want to see how these concepts are brought into fruition. 

The magic system definitely gave me similar vibes to Leigh Bardugo’s Grishaverse, and the aesthetic of this world definitely felt influenced series like The Untamed. The lore of this world felt well-developed and even though we only view the world through a single character’s eyes, I definitely felt like we were provided with more than sufficient world-building. 

My favourite part of this book was the characters. Forest of Souls includes a beautiful sisterly-friendship between the protagonist Sirscha and her familiar Saengo. Lee does an amazing job portraying the platonic love between the two girls, and how their situation affects them not only as individuals but as partners. The lack of romance in this book is refreshing, but not entirely not existent, as there is definitely foundation laid down for it. Whatever the author ultimately decides, I can only imagine it being executed well, as her ability to set up characters and their relationships are definitely above average.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Amari and the Night Brothers Review (Blog Tour)

Amari and the Night Brothers Review (Blog Tour)

By B.B. Alston

Print Length: 416 pages

Genre: Middle-Grade Fantasy

Release Date January 19, 2021

Available for pre-order on Amazon and B&N

Special thanks to theWriteReads and Egmont Publishing for providing me with an ARC.

Amari Peters knows three things.

Her big brother Quinton has gone missing.

No one will talk about it.

His mysterious job holds the secret . . .

So when Amari gets an invitation to the Bureau of Supernatural Affairs, she’s certain this is her chance to find Quinton. But first she has to get her head around the new world of the Bureau, where mermaids, aliens and magicians are real, and her roommate is a weredragon.

Amari must compete against kids who’ve known about the supernatural world their whole lives, and when each trainee is awarded a special supernatural talent, Amari is given an illegal talent – one that the Bureau views as dangerous.

With an evil magician threatening the whole supernatural world, and her own classmates thinking she is the enemy, Amari has never felt more alone. But if she doesn’t pass the three tryouts, she may never find out what happened to Quinton . . . (Goodreads)

Amari and the Night Brothers is a charming fantastical middle-grade book that promises to open a new world for its readers. It delivers and then some! Managing to introduce us to a world that is, in some vague ways, reminiscent of the wizarding world, but far larger and dare I say better. For being such a vast world it is well realized, as well as the characters in the story. The relationships between the characters definitely had Percy Jackson-vibes, a fleshed-out realism that makes them all the more relatable and loveable. 

For me, this book was often reminiscent of the Men in Black franchise but on a much larger and more magical scale. This is the sort of book I would have been obsessed with when I was in the intended age category, and still intend to follow as an adult. This book manages to pack a large story into a small package and knowing there is more to come and so much more of this world to explore in what makes this book memorable. This is the sort of book you read as a kid and obsess over, convinced that if your nomination was detected that you’d follow in our titular heroine Amari’s path.

This book, most importantly, manages to pack in some heavy themes. Tackling issues children today, and children of yesterday, have dealt with. It’s a type of story we need more of. 

Amari and the Night Brothers is a fun book for everyone, regardless of age. There are lessons to be learned, fun to be had, and so many interesting characters to meet along the way. I’m glad to have had the opportunity to read this book and look forward to future instalments.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Ruinsong Review

Ruinsong Review

By Julia Ember

Publisher: Darrar, Straus, and Giroux

Print Length: 368 pages

Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Release Date November 24th 2020

Available for pre-order on Amazon and Barnes and Noble

Special thanks to Macmillan for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

Her voice was her prison…

Now it’s her weapon.

In a world where magic is sung, a powerful mage named Cadence has been forced to torture her country’s disgraced nobility at her ruthless queen’s bidding.

But when she is reunited with her childhood friend, a noblewoman with ties to the underground rebellion, she must finally make a choice: Take a stand to free their country from oppression, or follow in the queen’s footsteps and become a monster herself. (Goodreads)

Ruinsong is a delightfully dark and sapphic fantasy retelling of Phantom of the Opera that boast exceptional writing and a unique take on magic. This book is refreshingly queer and uses every page to its advantage. I devoured this book, and foresee myself wanting to do so again. 

I picked up this book because of its gorgeous cover and promise of a sapphic relationship. The latter is delivered and then some, as the author throughs in world-building details that illustrate a world more accepting (in some, but not all) of queerness. As a queer individual, I was b=both charmed and delighted at even the smallest of details representing under-represented communities. The sapphic nature of the book was particularly refreshing, do to the tendency of gay male relationships being seemingly favoured in publishing. The relationship is a slow-burn enemies-to-lover sort of romance, which, on its own, is swoon-worthy. Throw in two girls, both powerful in their own right, rebelling against the injustice of the crown… Well, you get a damn good book.

This book is a relatively short read, but for what it lacks in page count, it makes up with it’ well-crafted world. Not a single detail of this book is unnecessary, as every page is used wisely. We get a glimpse into a world that is so well developed it may as well be real. While reading this book, you are transported into this world, being slowly destroyed by a tortuous dictator, and you see the contrast of the palace and city. 

The only criticism I can offer is in regards to the villain of the book. While she is captivating, her motivations and methods of evil aren’t particularly unique. Regardless, she still manages to be terrifying, holding her power with elegance. Even when she cracks, she does so with a rare sort of grace. 

The magic system in this book is one of its strongest aspects. There are defined limits and defining aspects of power. The decision to make the magic music-based is truly genius, and its application is so well done. 

I fully intend on acquiring a physical copy of this book, because I thoroughly enjoyed it and see myself wanting to reread it. I recommend this book to anyone who loves dark fantasy and overthrowing tyrannical matriarchies.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

A Court of Wings and Ruin Review

A Court of Wings and Ruin Review

By  Sarah J. Maas

Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s Books

Print Length: 699 pages

Release Year: 2017

Genre: New Adult, Fantasy

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 4.44

Available on Amazon, B&N, and Libby

Looming war threatens all Feyre holds dear in the third volume of the #1 New York Times bestselling A Court of Thorns and Roses series.

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s manoeuvrings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit – and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well.

As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords – and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

In this thrilling third book in the #1 New York Times bestselling series from Sarah J. Maas, the earth will be painted red as mighty armies grapple for power over the one thing that could destroy them all. (Goodreads)

While I totally love the A Court of Thorns and Roses series, A Court of Wings and Ruin was honestly the hardest for me to get through. I initially began reading it early in the year only to put it down around chapter thirty-something. Later in the year, I picked it back up, this time with the intent of finishing it. I don’t think it was an issue of as to whether I was going to finish it, but when. With Maas’ writing, I tend to get so utterly engulfed in what’s going on that I sometimes have to set the book down solely to recover emotionally from the events of the story. And let me tell you, A Court of Wings and Ruin is an intense read that had me going through a rollercoaster of emotions. By the end of the book, I had laughed and sobbed. It was simply… a lot. 

A Court of Thorns and Roses is one of those series that is book bad and good in ways that are almost impossible for me to articulate. You can spend a lot of time picking them apart, but you can spend just as much time praising them. Really, I can’t tell you where this series is for you, because of how polarizing it is. All I can say is that its 1000% for me. 

Read the first book, if you enjoy it, or at the very least have mixed feeling read the second. If you like the second you are guaranteed to like the third.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Objective Ratings

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Goblin King Review

Goblin King Review

By Kara Barbieri

Publisher: Wednesday Books

Print Length: 320 pages

Genre: Young Adult Fantasy

Release Date: November 17, 2020

Available on Amazon and B&N

Special thanks to Netgalley and Wednesday Books for providing me with an ARC.

The Hunt is over, but the War has just begun.

Against all odds, Janneke has survived the Hunt for the Stag–but all good things come with a cost. Lydian might be dead, but he took the Stag with him. Janneke now holds the mantle, while Soren, now her equal in every way, has become the new Erlking. Janneke’s powers as the new Stag has brought along haunting visions of a world thrown into chaos and the ghost of Lydian taunts her with the riddles he spoke of when he was alive.

When Janneke discovers the truth of Lydian and his madness, she’s forced to see her tormentor in a different light for the first time. The world they know is dying and Lydian may have been the only person with the key to saving it. (Goodreads)

Goblin King is a worthy sequel to White Stag. The book follows a very similar format of its predecessor, Goblin King includes a fair amount of action, but is ultimately an examination of emotion and healing. This book is much more character-driven than many other fantasy books. Still, it excels at integrating fantastical elements in a story that is ultimately the story of a young woman healing. 

The plot of the book is considerably formulaic and is very reminiscent of the first book. The characters head out on a grand journey with high stakes, they get quite beaten up, but they ultimately pull through. The action is entertaining enough, but the story isn’t really about the sheer brutality of goblin-kind. Barbieri presents a fantastical book about healing from significant trauma, heavily inspired by her own struggles. For readers who’ve gone through similar struggles, there is a specific power in being able to see yourself reflected in a powerful character such as the protagonist Janneke.

The writing overall is very well done. There is evident growth in the authors writing since her first book, and this book, while not having quite the bite as the first, is the better written of the two. The plot is straightforward and well-paced, and the underlying message is just as evident. 

For those who have read White Stag, and those who are fans of Norse Mythology, this is a worthwhile read. There is a handful of trigger warnings, so be sure to research that beforehand. As mentioned above, this book is heavily about healing and maybe an intensely emotional read for some.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

A Deal with the Elf King Review

A Deal with the Elf King Review

By Elise Kova

Publisher: Silver Wing Press

Print Length: 338 pages

Release Year: 2020

Genre: Romance, Fantasy, New Adult

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 3.99

Available on Amazon

Special thanks to Elise Kova for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

The elves come for two things: war and wives. In both cases, they come for death.

Three-thousand years ago, humans were hunted by powerful races with wild magic until the treaty was formed. Now, for centuries, the elves have taken a young woman from Luella’s village to be their Human Queen.

To be chosen is seen as a mark of death by the townsfolk. A mark nineteen-year-old Luella is grateful to have escaped as a girl. Instead, she’s dedicated her life to studying herbology and becoming the town’s only healer.

That is, until the Elf King unexpectedly arrives… for her.

Everything Luella had thought she’d known about her life, and herself, was a lie. Taken to a land filled with wild magic, Luella is forced to be the new queen to a cold yet blisteringly handsome Elf King. Once there, she learns about a dying world that only she can save.

The magical land of Midscape pulls on one corner of her heart, her home and people tug on another… but what will truly break her is a passion she never wanted. (Goodreads)

My heart is not okay.

I’m at a point in my reading journey that if you tell me a book even vaguely resembles A Court of Thorns and Roses, I’ll shamelessly pick it up. When I saw Elise Kova, who is one of my most favourite writers, was coming out with a book with the words “[…] for fans of A Court of Thorns and Roses[…]” I was ecstatic. 

And when the opportunity arose for me to apply for an ARC… well, can you blame me? And let me tell you, I devoured it. Devoured it. I literally had to delay this review for two days cause I needed to recover from reading this book emotionally. 

Kova is definitely a master of making her readers overwhelmed with anticipation. She is one of the few authors that can have me so enraptured that I forget to breathe. I don’t know how many times I had to take a break, even over the smallest developments. This book, in particular, throws you headfirst into the story, not giving you time to prepare for the coming events. You know how the book ends, but the journey is what makes it worth it. Kova is undeniably talented when it comes to making you fall in love with her characters quickly, making it impossible to complain about the predictive nature of her writing. It’s one thing to know what is going to happen, but another to actually watch it unfold with all the excellent character development and swoon-worthy relationship development. 

Picking up this book, you can tell A Deal with the Elf King is a passion project. As a writer and reader, you can feel the love that went into this story. It was written as an escape and subsequently worked very well in letting the reader escape as well. This book, while having essential themes, A Deal with the Elf King, manages to be a feel-good read; something you can snuggle under the blankets and escape with. 

I’m inclined to call it a guilty pleasure, but the thing is: I’m not guilty whatsoever. 

Ms. Kova, if you happen to stumble upon this, let me tell you: if you write it I’m buying it. 

And you should too. There really isn’t anything to complain about with this book. As mentioned, the romance is absolutely swoon-worthy, and the magical world-building is fun and does its job well. These books aren’t hard to read, and that’s what makes it so wonderful. All the fun of fantasy without the overwhelming amounts of world-building information. 

I truly recommend checking out this book, whether it be for a little escapism, or just to have something to read. And while you’re at it, check out other works by the author as well.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

The Faithless Hawk Review

The Faithless Hawk Review

By Margaret Owen

Publisher: Henry Holt & Company

Print Length: 400 pages

Release Year: 2020

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 4.43

Available on Amazon, B&N, Libby (availability may vary by region)

As the new chieftain of the Crows, Fie knows better than to expect a royal to keep his word. Still she’s hopeful that Prince Jasimir will fulfill his oath to protect her fellow Crows. But then black smoke fills the sky, signaling the death of King Surimir and the beginning of Queen Rhusana’s ruthless bid for the throne.

Queen Rhusana wins popular support by waging a brutal campaign against the Crows, blaming them for the poisonous plague that wracks the nation.

A desperate Fie clings onto a prophecy that a long-forgotten god will return and provide a cure to the plague. Fie must team up with old friends? and an old flame? to track down a dead god and save her people. (Goodreads)

Special thanks to Henry Holt for providing with an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

The Faithless Hawk is the conclusion to one of the best duologies I’ve ever read. If you haven’t read the first book in the duology, The Merciful Crow,  you should definitely do so as it is one of the most unique and well done young adults books I’ve read in a long while. This series is a good entry point for many fantasy readers, as it definitely teaches you to keep track of certain details; because while the books look short they are packed with world-building. For those who have read The Merciful Crow you may even find yourself needing to revisit it before, or after, reading its sequel. There is so much that can be missed, that I’m sure when I pick up this series again I’ll discover something I didn’t the first time. 

The writing continues to be exceptional, and a true experience to read as the stylization enhances the reading experience. The characters, the world, all of its is so well realized that it’s hard to believe this story fits into two relatively thin books. When I read the first book I noticed there was definitely a heavy focus on world-building, and while this book achieves a lot in that realm, this sequel definitely takes its time to further delve into its characters. I found myself much more emotionally invested in what happened to the characters and certain events held more weight as a result. It’d be interesting to see if this changes how I view the characters in the first book when I get a chance to reread it (if you haven’t already noticed, I definitely plan on rereading this series.)

While reading, its easy to become absolutely engrossed in what is happening, the book is quite hard to put down. I recommend for readers looking for a shorter fantasy series, this one 100 times! You really won’t regret it. And for younger readers, or those who just aren’t used to fantasy this book is definitely a good gateway book into the broader genre.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

My Hero Academia Vol. 1 Review

My Hero Academia Vol. 1 Review

By Kohei Horikoshi

Publisher: Viz Media

Print Length: 192 pages

Release Year: 2015

Genre: Fantasy Manga/ Comic

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 4.49

Available on Amazon and B&N

What would the world be like if 80 percent of the population manifested superpowers called “Quirks” at age four? Heroes and villains would be battling it out everywhere! Being a hero would mean learning to use your power, but where would you go to study? The Hero Academy of course! But what would you do if you were one of the 20 percent who were born Quirkless?

Middle school student Izuku Midoriya wants to be a hero more than anything, but he hasn’t got an ounce of power in him. With no chance of ever getting into the prestigious U.A. High School for budding heroes, his life is looking more and more like a dead end. Then an encounter with All Might, the greatest hero of them all, gives him a chance to change his destiny… (Goodreads)

My Hero Academia (also known as Bokuno Hero Academia 僕のヒーローアカデミア) is a popular Japanese manga (and anime) series created by Kohei Horikoshi and follows the trials and tribulations of a young man named Izuku Midoriya. In a world where the majority of people are born with powers called “quirks” the job of pro-Hero is given to those who chose to use their quirks in the pursuit of justice. Midoriya, a quirkless middle schooler dreams of enrolling in the Hero course at the prestigious U.A. High, the alma mater of his idol All Might. We follow as he begins his journey towards becoming the world’s number one hero and the new symbol of peace.

Volume One, which includes chapters 1-7 both introduces us to the majority of the series key characters as well as introduces you to the world and its quirk system. Following the introductions, the series goes into what might as well be its first arc, which I will call the “Deku v. Kaachan Pt. 1;” which follows the first fight between the protagonist Izuku and his rival Katsuki. The end of the manga marks the beginning of this arc. 

From what I’ve seen the main arguments against this book is that the plot and world design is considerably derivative, reviewers often citing its similarities to Marvel’s X-Men series. Though i agree that at face value this is true, I will argue that this argument is not sufficient with all things considered. Borrowing different concepts is a common practice in comics and all storytelling mediums for that matter, and as a result, what really matters is how it is executed. It is well known that the author Horikoshi is a fan of American comics, so it is reasonable to conclude that it did, in fact, influence his work, but that isn’t a bad thing. Having only read the first volume is the reason most focus more on what is evidently derivative, but that is not enough of a sample size to call the series itself that. I will simply say, if you don’t like this volume because of its similarity to other works, at least read up until the third volume. Due to this volume’s focus on character and world-building, I would say that the true story doesn’t start until the following volume. (I’d like to add that I find this series to be a good introduction to America comics to Japanese readers, and vice verse with Japanese manga and American readers.)

When it comes down to it, this volume does a good job at what it set out to do, though I believe it is probably the worst of the beginning volumes. I wouldn’t find it fair to complain much though, considering this was a very formative and challenging time for the writer who was relatively new to the fame this series would gain. Additionally, many serial writers often need some time to truly fall into rhythm with their story.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Magic Review

Magic Review

By Mike Russell 

Publisher: StrangeBooks

Print Length: 268 pages

Release Year: 2020

Genre: Fantasy Contemporary

Avg. Goodreads Rating: 3.84

Available on Amazon

Does magic exist? Charlie Watson thinks it does and he wants to tell you all about it. Before he was famous, Charlie Watson decided to write a book to share with the world everything he knew about magic. This is that book. You will discover why Charlie always wears a top hat, why his house is full of rabbits, how magic wands are made, how the universe began, and much, much more. Plus, for the first time, Charlie tells of the strange events that led him from England to the Arctic, to perform the extraordinary feat that made him famous, and he finally reveals whether that extraordinary feat was magic or whether it was just a trick. (Goodreads)

Special thanks to StrangeBooks for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Magic is the second book I’ve read by Mike Russell, and it definitely continues to perpetuate what seems to be an overarching theme of his writing: the whimsicality of otherness. His writing continues to come off as consistently surreal, as Russell is one the better surrealist writers. In Magic, he again utilises simplistic writing to vividly illustrate a dadaistic view version of the world, that at times feels a little like a fever dream.

Magic takes a magical view of the world in the most literal sense, going so far as to describe the big bang as an immense act of magic. Magic in this book is often present as a soft version of itself, for the sake of continuing the themes of otherness. There is certain humour that the softer writing style allots Russell, as he tells a story that manages to feel anything but serious. The book isn’t really meant to be serious, but for those who like to look deep to find more existential themes Russell’s work delivers. 

This book is a speedy read, largely due to the casual writing style. The experience of reading this book is reminiscent of the whimsy of reading a magical children’s book, only more existential. It’s a great comfort read, something that really lightens the mood; which is honestly what we need most this year. 

While I enjoyed this book very much, for purely subjective reasons, my personal rating is a little lower. This, I believe, is primarily due to personal circumstances that simply led to this book just not sitting right with me. I think that if I read under a calmer circumstance, I would have easily rated it higher, but as of late books such as this haven’t appealed to me. Regardless I’m interested in reading more by Russell in the future, as well as keeping up with the author’s releases. I recommend this book to anyone who just needs to escape for a bit in the more relaxing reading environment this book creates.

Subjective Rating

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Objective Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Final Rating

Rating: 4 out of 5.